Round 4 Interlagos 1975

Discussion in 'Group C Honey Jar Series' started by John vd Geest, Apr 16, 2018.

  1. John vd Geest

    John vd Geest Administrator Staff Member SRO Team Member

    The land on which the circuit is located was originally bought in 1926 by property developers who wanted to build accommodations.[1] Following difficulties partly due to the 1929 stock market crash, it was decided to build a racing circuit instead, construction started in 1938 and the track was inaugurated in May 1940.[1] The design was based on New York's Roosevelt Field Raceway (1937 layout).[2]

    The traditional name of the circuit (literally, "between lakes") comes from its location on the neighborhood of Interlagos, a region between two large artificial lakes, Guarapiranga and Billings, which were built in the early 20th century to supply the city with water and electric power. It was renamed in 1985 from "Autódromo de Interlagos" to its current name to honor the Brazilian Formula One driver José Carlos Pace, who died in a plane crash in 1977.[3]

    Formula One started racing there in 1972, the first year being a non-championship race, won by Argentinean Carlos Reutemann. The first World Championship Brazilian Grand Prix was held at Interlagos in 1973, the race won by defending Formula One World Champion and São Paulo local Emerson Fittipaldi. Fittipaldi won the race again the following year in bad weather and Brazilian driver José Carlos Pace won his only race at Interlagos in 1975.


     
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  2. John vd Geest

    John vd Geest Administrator Staff Member SRO Team Member

    The start / finish straight and the straight after turn 2 are pretty bumpy. The rest of the track is reasonably flat.

    More modern sportscars don't feel the bumps so much, but the Group C are very stiff and you will have to grab you steeringwheel a little bit tighter going over them.
    I don't know if the creator of the track put the bumps in on purpose or accidental, but it really contributes to the immersion of that old, classic track.
    Going over the finish straight and the next one, you shake, rattle and roll inside your car.
    So, in short, Group C feel the bumps more, also because you go over them with 290+ km/h.



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    Last edited: Apr 20, 2018
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  3. John vd Geest

    John vd Geest Administrator Staff Member SRO Team Member

    If I can offer you guys a free tip, I'll tell you how I prepare for a race like this ...

    I want to get used to the chaos of many cars around me and blocking my view as I'm very close behind them before a brakingzone.
    I also want to know where the "spaces" are for overtaking without crashing.
    I also want to know what it's like to drive behind someone very close the whole lap.

    How can you learn this? Simple:
    Do a few short races against the AI and you will get used to racing conditions very quickly and be well prepared.
    (Just hang back on the first few corners on Interlagos, because the AI crashes in turn 3. After that it's good racing.)
     
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  4. John vd Geest

    John vd Geest Administrator Staff Member SRO Team Member

    Interlagos 1975 Sign up trailer

     
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  5. Davide Ricciardi

    Davide Ricciardi Pro Driver

    I am electrified :p

    ...Interlagos seems not to be a Sauber track, no one it's a Sauber track anyway :D:D...
     
  6. John vd Geest

    John vd Geest Administrator Staff Member SRO Team Member

    Any track with very long straights is a Sauber track LOL. They pull away on the straight and block you in the corners. I could not overtake the leading Sauber like that at Riverside and I tried lap after lap with no end. But ... the Oisterreichring is a 100% Sauber track. Wouldn't be surprised if I get lapped there by a Sauber haha.
     
  7. Davide Ricciardi

    Davide Ricciardi Pro Driver

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